Archive for May, 2007

Texas Chainsaw Musical : Heading To The MTV Movie Awards!

// May 30th, 2007 // Comments Off // Funny

I wanted to update you guys and say thanks from Paul and Zan, they have been officially nominated for an MTV video award and will be walking the red carpet this Sunday night. How cool is that! They haven’t won yet, but that is why I’m sending this around one more time. They need your votes one more time!!!!!!!!!! This time there are five finalists. They will be shown throughout the week on MTV and at the awards show as well.

Here is the link:

VOTE HERE!!!!!!

Make sure you vote for the Texas Chainsaw Musical, there are two spoofs on that movie.

Please make one more round of emails and blogs about this, the grassroots promotion we did last time really worked and I know it can work again!!!

Thanks for your help!!!!!!

Paul and Zan both attended Belmont and are really doing some great things in L.A., this time they did a spoof that is doing incredible. Help out our friends from Belmont and Nashville!!!!

Emma Time

// May 23rd, 2007 // Comments Off // life

Here’s some photos that make me smile…

Emma

Emma TieDye

Eureka Moments Of The Past 25 Years

// May 22nd, 2007 // Comments Off // life

USA Today has compiled a list of the top 25 Eureka inventions for our time… Not sure I agree on the order, but thinking about life without some of these things is funny. Thanks to the many inventors who have found ways for me to occupy my time…. :)

I have to question the lettuce in a bag… really not that big of deal for me.

 

USA TODAY

1Cellphones

Car phones were around in the 1970s, but it wasn’t until 1983 that Motorola introduced the first widely available handheld cellphone. The DynaTAC 8000x weighed almost 2 pounds, but it still cost $3,995.

 

 

2Laptop computers

It was about as portable as a sewing machine. But the 28-pound Compaq Portable – Compaq Computer’s very first product – was the first portable IBM-compatible PC on the market. More than 53,000 sold in the year after its 1983 launch, despite a price usually topping $3,000.

 

 

AP

3BlackBerries

An obscure Canadian pager company, Research In Motion, shortened attention spans around the world with the launch of the BlackBerry mobile e-mail device in 1999.

 

 

4Debit cards

Ka-ching! Who needs cash when you’ve got a debit card? They took off after Visa launched its check card in 1995. Before then, less than 2% of Americans used debit cards. Ten years later, debit card transactions exceeded those on credit cards.

 

 

5Caller ID

Bill collectors and your annoying Uncle Ned are easy to ignore with this invention introduced by BellSouth in 1984 in Orlando. Caller ID followed voice mail, an invention created a decade before to make up for declining secretarial employment.

 

 

USA TODAY

6DVDs

Americans traded all those hours rewinding video cassettes for hours watching directors kibitz about behind-the-scenes antics with the introduction of digital video discs in 1995. Consumers spent $7.4 billion on DVD rentals last year, up 10%. VHS rentals plummeted 74%, to $281 million.

 

 

7Lithium rechargeable batteries

How many AAs does it take to power a laptop? Almost no one knows, thanks to the durable rechargeable battery Sony brought to market in 1991. It made its debut in a Sony camcorder – and has provided juice for laptops, cellphones, digital cameras and other portable electronics ever since.

 

 

 

8iPods

Walking down the sidewalk hasn’t been the same since November 2001, when Apple introduced its iconic portable digital music player. It wasn’t the first player, but fans declared it the coolest and easiest to use by snapping up more than 100 million of them.

 

 

9Pay at the pump

Filling up the tank became even more self-serve when a gas station chain in Abilene, Texas, invented technology that turned the pump into a quasi-ATM.

 

 

10Lettuce in a bag

Americans discovered there’s more to salad than iceberg lettuce drowning in bottled dressing after the rollout of mixed lettuce greens in a bag. Fresh Express in Salinas, Calif., made that possible by inventing a high-tech plastic bag introduced nationwide in 1989. That helped ignite a whole consumer category of portion-controlled foods, such as bagged baby carrots.

 

 

AFP/Getty Images

11Digital cameras

Kodak unveiled a digital camera for professionals in 1986, when consumers were still getting millions of rolls of film processed in labs. Apple followed with the first consumer version eight years later. But it wasn’t until this century that cameras got affordable, driving consumers to buy a forecast 30 million this year.

 

 

12Doppler radar

We became a nation of weather fans as Doppler radar brought up-to-the-minute images to TV starting in 1990, a dozen years after the Weather Channel’s launch turned forecasters such as Jim Cantore into celebrities.

 

 

 

13Flat-panel TVs

RCA pioneered flat-panel technology in the late 1960s. But it took nearly four decades before consumers got the idea. This year, 68% of all digital TVs sold are forecast to come with flat panels.

 

 

14Electronic tolls

Throwing quarters in a tollbooth bin became a thing of the past when the North Texas Tollway Authority started its TollTag system in the Dallas area in 1989. Now, millions of commuters prepay tolls and rely on electronic gadgets attached to their cars to zip through toll plazas.

 

 

15PowerPoint

Lecturers from CEOs to sixth-graders display topic headings and charts with the click of a mouse. PowerPoint was invented by Forethought. Microsoft bought Forethought in 1987, unveiled its Windows version in 1990 and changed public speaking forever.

 

 

USA TODAY

16Microwavable popcorn

We can credit – and blame – food scientists for simultaneously making possible lunch-in-a-hurry and that terrible burnt smell wafting from the office microwave oven. General Mills paved the way with the launch of Act II non-refrigerated microwaveable popcorn in 1984.

 

 

AP

17 High-tech footwear

Plain canvas sneakers got tossed to the back of the closet when Nike launched Air Jordans in 1985, followed by Reebok’s The Pump in 1989, giving rise to the performance-footwear industry.

 

 

18Online stock trading

Investors jettisoned pricey stockbrokers after an Ameritrade predecessor offered online stock trading in 1994. During the market runup that followed, CNBC’s Maria Bartiromo became a household name, and PCs morphed into slot machines for a new breed of investor: day traders.

 

 

 

19Big Bertha golf clubs

A World War I cannon inspired one of the biggest golf innovations when Ely Callaway created the oversize, wide-bodied stainless steel wood he dubbed Big Bertha in 1991. Callaway Golf followed up with the Great Big Bertha, Biggest Big Bertha, Great Big Bertha II, Big Bertha 454 and today’s Big Bertha 460..

 

 

20Disposable contacts

A scream followed by, “No one move!” once routinely signaled that someone had dropped a pricey contact lens. Daily disposables – contacts worn for just a day before they’re tossed – arrived in the USA in 1995.

 

 

21StairMaster

Arnold Schwarzenegger’s breakout performance in Pumping Iron wasn’t enough to get Americans pouring into gyms. Technology led the way with the StairMaster, one of the first machines to turn gyms into modern exercise arenas after it was introduced in Tulsa in 1986.

 

 

 

22TiVo

The gadget is now a verb, with 4.4 million subscribers TiVo-ing their favorite TV shows. The digital device changed TV-viewing habits after the first TiVo was shipped in 1999.

 

 

23Purell

Germs trembled, and parents rejoiced (“What in the world is that on your hands?!”) when Gojo in Akron, Ohio, created Purell hand sanitizer. The market for packaged handwipes and towlettes took off amid health scares over avian flu and post-9/11 threats.

 

 

24Home satellite TV

The dishes that receive signals were once so big and pricey, they’d pull down your house if you tried strapping them to the chimney. But the 1994 launch of service from DirecTV led to today’s supercompact dishes and lower prices, beaming tonight’s Dancing with the Stars to the USA’s more remote places.

 

 

25Karaoke

What makes you sound so very good singing Stairway to Heaven? Two stiff drinks get you on stage in front of amused and horrified co-workers. But it’s the karaoke machine invented in 1983 that really did the trick. The most popular karaoke song today? Patsy Cline’s Crazy, says Karaoka.com.

 

Source: Researched and written by USA TODAY’s Byron Acohido, Jim Hopkins, Jefferson Graham and Michelle Kessler; Photo research by Sonja Foster and Denny Gainer, USA TODAY.

In Less Than 2 Hours…

// May 21st, 2007 // Comments Off // life

my addiction will be ending… at least until next season. Tonight Heroes and 24 will give me the satisfaction of coming to an end, only to leave me wondering what will happen next year. Heroes has been my new favorite show this year and they have definitely kicked it into full gear for the ending…

I’m Free!!!! Well, in a few hours…. see you then.

Jack Bauer

Texas Chainsaw Musical – Please Read!!!!!

// May 17th, 2007 // Comments Off // life

Well, a few of my really good friends have created this hilarious movie and now it has a chance to win a Golden Popcorn on the MTV Movie awards. Please pass this along and vote for your fellow Nashvillians turned L.A. goons. :) Here’s the link to go vote… watch below and pass this along or even post in your blogs!!!!

Thanks!

Great job to Paul, Zan & Mark!!!!!!!!!!!!

Are You Kidding Me?

// May 16th, 2007 // Comments Off // life

Melinda got booted off Idol tonight… She is by far one of the most talented voices that has ever hit that stage and definitely the best of this season. I shouldn’t be surprised after seeing how long Sanjaya stuck around.. maybe I’m a little biased since she went to and graduated from Belmont, the school I owe my first born to.

Congratulations America you’ve chosen beatboxing over great singing… It’s no question who’ll have the longer career. Remember the Fat Boys? :)

Busy Days – Busy Nights

// May 15th, 2007 // Comments Off // life, Music & Entertainment

I just wanted to share with you all what I’ll be looking at until June 1st. I have 3 BIG deadlines June 1st… No complaints, I thank God for the work.

This is what I have forward to looking at:

Pro Tools HD

Pretty, huh?

N.C., Here I Come!

// May 9th, 2007 // Comments Off // Music & Entertainment

I’m heading to Charlotte, NC to record a live show for a worship group.  I’m loading up the Pro Tools rig and packing up pics of my girls.  This will be the first time I’ve been away since Emma was born.  Wow.  This could be tough!

I’m looking forward to it, I haven’t done a lot of “live” recording so it will be something new!  We’ve rented a bunch of gear, mic pre’s, cables, a backup recording system and mics…. I just pray that we have thought of everything!  If not, I’m sure there’s a backend company in Charlotte… right?  :)

Replacing Your Ipod Battery

// May 8th, 2007 // Comments Off // life

In 4 years I’ve went through 3 ipods. I don’t know why, but the battery dies or the hard drive decides to quit working. I mixed and matched the dead ipods to get one good working one and some friends wanted to know how I did it. Well, I found this video that will explain it easier than I can. Evidently this is something a lot of people have problems with. Hope this helps!

How To Replace Your iPod’s Battery

 

Ipodbattery One of the biggest complaints about the iPod is the device’s poor battery performance. An iPod holds a charge just fine when it’s new, but after a year or so of regular use, the operating time of the stock battery starts to shorten drastically.

When your iPod’s battery goes South, you’re left with a few replacement options. You can send the unit to Apple and pay $66, or you can buy a replacement kit for about $25-30 and perform the iPod surgery yourself.

For this replacement, we used a 3rd generation iPod battery kit from a company called Blue Raven. Until recently, you could only purchase replacement kits on the web. But these Blue Raven kits are available in retail stores like CompUSA and Micro Center, a first for iPod battery kits.

The idea of cracking open your precious little iPod and performing surgery on the thing sounds daunting. But as demonstrated in this four-minute video, it’s really not difficult at all. The hardest part is getting the case open — you’ll probably scratch up the iPod’s plastic top half unless you’re very careful — but after that, you can be done in seconds. And the new batteries last longer than the old ones, too.

Remember that any damage you do to your iPod during the replacement is your own responsibility. Also, cracking open your iPod and messing with its guts will void your warranty.

Need A Happy Butt?

// May 7th, 2007 // Comments Off // life

I saw this commercial this morning on MSNBC.. yes, it’s real!!!